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Stacie de Armas on breaking stereotypes and advocating for Latinas

Stacie de Armas is the Senior Vice President of Diversity Insights & Initiatives at Nielsen, where she conducts data harvesting, narrative development, and socialization of inclusive insights that cascade across multiple diverse identity groups—storytelling with a purpose. She is passionate about equity and advocacy for Latinos. 

Breaking stereotypes and advocating for equity

Stacie de Armas describes herself as “a Latina, a Cubana, a daughter, granddaughter, a sister, a tia, a mother, a seeker, and a teller of truth, ” and says being a Latinas has been her “superpower” in her work. At Nielsen, her position sits in a unique space that allows her to use Nielsen’s resources to uncover diverse community insights that empower and educate. Growing up, she never imagined she could do this job or have an extensive background as a consumer researcher, behaviorist, and thought leader in diverse communities. 

“I never knew I could be a researcher. Growing up, stereotypes surrounded me on television, if I saw myself at all. And I didn’t realize that I could be more,” says Stacie. “I didn’t see myself on screen, and when I did, I didn’t see a doctor, or a scientist, or a strong woman. I often saw Latinas presented in a light that I didn’t recognize and wasn’t my truth. In my job, I get to change that stereotype for all women.”  

Now, she’s breaking stereotypes for herself and others to show Latinas their power and potential. Looking back on her career, she notes a strong common thread of a passion for equity that has woven through all her experiences. 

“From the outside, my career seems like a series of opportunities that built on previous ones, but upon closer evaluation, you can see early signs of my passion for equity. At the time, however,  I didn’t quite see it like that. I thought all the advances I made were happenstance or serendipitous,” says Stacie. 

In one of her earliest working experiences, Stacie worked as a waitress throughout college. She was one of the few waitresses who spoke Spanish and soon formed fond friendships with the back-of-the-house staff. 

“I felt aligned and had common experiences with our Spanish-speaking team, and I really enjoyed those friendships. They were authentic. I felt like I belonged with them, and we had shared backgrounds,” Stacie says. “I found myself advocating for them in small ways.  As it happened, I saw early on there was inequity in how they were treated, and I found it hard to stand by and watch it unfold.”   

Later in college, Stacie began working at a bank, where she quickly fell into a role where she supported Latino clients. Again, because of her Latina background and ability to speak Spanish, Stacie found herself advocating for them. She transitioned from bank teller to supporting loan signings and new accounts, explaining the various documents that were not in Spanish at the time. Rather than just filling quotas, Stacie worked to help her Latino clients learn the inner workings of the U.S. banking system. 

advocacy for Latinos, breaking stereotypes, Stacie de Armas

On breaking stereotypes: “I never knew I could be a researcher. Growing up, stereotypes surrounded me on television if I saw myself at all. And I didn’t realize that I could be more.” (Photo courtesy Stacie de Armas)

“Naturally, I focused on this client base and found ways to meet their current needs without exorbitant fees. My clients would bring their friends and family, and others to bank with me. It was such an honor at the time, and I felt mutual respect.” 

After college, Stacie moved on from banking to work at an ad agency. Again, a similar situation presented itself. 

“I was an assistant buyer, and we worked primarily in English-speaking markets, but we did handle some Spanish language broadcast and cable network advertising buying for a few clients.  I noticed we didn’t have a good understanding of the offerings, the audience, or the value of the outlets we worked with. Our conversations and negotiations with our English language broadcasters were more detailed. The data was there, but evaluating our Spanish Language networks wasn’t a priority,” Stacie explains. 

So Stacie took the initiative and asked to focus on the Spanish market. She then began meeting with the agency’s Spanish language media companies and advocating for a new strategy that had more equity for Spanish media companies. And from there, she began handling most of the agency’s Spanish language buying and planning. 

“And so the story goes,” she says. “ Everywhere I ever went, as a white presenting Latina, I felt an obligation to stand with, beside, and for my comunidad. And it shone through in my work. My career grew in the space of consumer advocacy, specifically for the Latino consumer.  This passion for equity had presented itself early in my life, and I have carried it with me throughout my career.”  

You might be interested: A National Conversation with Latina Leaders to address Latina Small Business recovery in Post-Covid19 economic crisis

Be bold and do not let yourself be ignored

Now, Stacie is committed to breaking down barriers for other Latinas and empowering them to break through stereotypes, as she did, and made their dreams a reality. 

To other aspiring Latina professionals, Stacie says her best advice is to be bold. 

“I think we are often not taught about the value of being bold.  We confuse being bold for being aggressive. Being bold is assertive but not aggressive. It is a learned skill. The advantage of being bold is you don’t have to bring it up again,” she says. “My strengths are my bold but kind approach, empathy, and listening. They have served me throughout my career and allowed me to grow and serve.”  

advocacy for Latinos, breaking stereotypes

“We confuse being bold for being aggressive. Being bold is assertive, but not aggressive. It is a learned skill.” (Photo courtesy Stacie de Armas)

Look beyond your core experience and follow your passion

Another important lesson learned along the way is: Look beyond your core experience for professional involvement and follow your passion.

“When Nielsen acquired Arbitron in 2013, I was given the opportunity to stay on the commercial side of the business or grow my career in an area of community outreach and advocacy,” says Stacie. 

Until then, Stacie had focused mostly on the US Hispanic consumer, working specifically with ad agencies and radio stations to help them craft and shape their narratives to serve the Hispanic communities better. She had no real experience in grassroots community outreach and advocacy though she figured she could pivot her business advocacy skills for consumers into community advocacy. 

“Even though my heart was on the commercial side, I decided to accept the position in the community and consumer outreach group and extend my experiences.  I didn’t know it at the time, but this would be by far the most significant career-impacting decision that I would ever make,” says Stacie. “I never anticipated how my passion for diversity business issues would flourish or the professional opportunities that I would have as a result.” 

Throughout her career, she has faced some obstacles, one of which was the challenge of imparting her passion for and value of the community to those in decision-making roles. She found that oftentimes her passion was not transferable or understandable. However, data is universal and hard to refute. 

“Supporting your story, advocacy, or plan with data is paramount and makes your point unignorable.” 

So go out there and be bold, assertive, and passionate about your story, project, or mission. Make things happen, and don’t let limiting stereotypes stop you from reaching your highest potential.

Damaris Diaz Joins National Conversation with Latina Leaders to Address Small Business Recovery Post-Covid 19

Damaris Diaz, popular correspondent who runs entertainment, fitness, and unique human-interest stories in Despierta America, the national morning show on Univision network, joins the National Conversation with Latina Leaders as Celebrity Speaker. The event also gathers a stellar lineup of leaders, influencers and entrepreneurs from around the country to talk about “Latina Small Business Post-Covid Recovery: Resources and Trends”.

Damaris Diaz, Stacie de Armas, small business recovery post-Covid

Damaris Diaz joins Stacie de Armas as Guest Speaker for virtual National Conversation with Latina Leaders event.

The free virtual event takes place Friday, March 19 from 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm EST – 9:00 am to 11:00 am PST on Zoom and Facebook Live. For free registration visit https://latina-small-business-recovery.eventbrite.com. Open to all entrepreneurs regardless of gender, race or ethnicity, and the general public. Organized by Latinas in Business Inc. a national non-profit membership organization.

She joins Keynote Speaker Stacie de Armas, Senior Vice President of Inclusive Insights & Initiatives and a leader within Nielsen’s Diversity, Equity & Inclusion practice, to help amplify the voice of the Latinx community struggling for resources and funding for small businesses, and protection of essential workers.

Susana G Baumann, President and CEO of Latinas in Business Inc, states, “After this very challenging year, it is important to regroup and think strategically about how to recover and protect our businesses and essential workers. I am very grateful for the response of these amazing Latina leaders that will provide the knowledge and resources needed for our community not only to survive, but to excel.”

Latina Leaders

Panel 1 Guest Speakers: Jennifer Garcia, Wendy Garcia, and Christina Fuentes.

The March 19 virtual event will include two panels with other remarkable guest speakers. Panel 1 will feature Jennifer Garcia, Interim CEO at Latino Business Action (LBAN), Stanford University; Wendy Garcia, Chief Diversity Officer at the Office of the NYC Comptroller Scott Stringer; and Christina Fuentes, Managing Director, Community Development, New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA).

Latina Leaders

Panel 2 Guest Speakers: Rosario B Casas, Ivelisse Rodriguez Simon, and Lucy Pinto.

Panel 2 will feature Rosario B Casas, CEO VR Americas; Ivelisse Rodriguez Simon, Managing Partner of Avante Capital; and Lucy Pinto, Grow with Google Program Manager.

“Although it is evident that throughout the United States, Latino entrepreneurs have encountered extreme difficulty, it is important to note that they have been extremely resilient and have adapted their businesses to navigate these ever-changing conditions,” Baumann continued. 

Join us and all our supporting organizations in bringing post-Covid recovery solutions to America’s backbone, small businesses, and especially minority women and Latina-owned businesses, their talent, innovation and their constant sense of purpose to support their communities. 

For registration to this free event, please visit: https://latina-small-business-recovery.eventbrite.com

small business recovery post-Covid, Damaris Diaz

Supporting media partners and organizations.

A National Conversation with Latina Leaders to address Latina Small Business recovery in Post-Covid19 economic crisis

National recognized speakers to share knowledge, resources and trends for growth at the “Latina Small Business Post-Covid Recovery: Resources and Trends” event, to give insight and support to the critical situation of millions of Latina businesses closing their doors due to the Post-Covid economic crisis.

National conversation with Latina Leaders, post-covid economic crisis, small business recovery

Latina small business post-Covid recovery, resources, and trends

Latinas in Business Inc is pleased to announce we are launching our second virtual National Conversation with Latina Leaders, gathering a stellar lineup of leaders, influencers and entrepreneurs from around the country at the “Latina Small Business Post-Covid: Recovery Resources and Trends” event. 

The event will take place Friday, March 19 from 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm EST – 9:00 am to 11:00 am PST on Zoom and Live streamed on Facebook. For free registration to this event visit Eventbrite. The event is open to all entrepreneurs regardless of gender, race, or ethnicity. 

“It is estimated that two-thirds of Latino-owned businesses will close their doors for good because of the crisis,” said Susana G Baumann, President & CEO, Latinas in Business Inc. “We want to make sure that we have a deep understanding of Latina and other minority women small business situations around the country, that our voices are heard, and that we bring solutions and perspectives to the national conversation,” she added.   

Stacie de Armas

Stacie de Armas, Senior Vice President of Inclusive Insights & Initiatives and Keynote Speaker. 

Stacie de Armas, Senior Vice President of Inclusive Insights & Initiatives and a leader within Nielsen’s Diversity, Equity & Inclusion practice, has been confirmed as Keynote speaker for the event. Through her knowledge and expertise in research and consumer behavior, she produces inclusive thought leadership and new research initiatives on diverse consumers and audiences. She is currently an active member of the Cultural Marketing Council Board of Directors, Google’s 21st Century Multicultural Marketing Council, and has received industry honors for her work in diversity marketing. 

Baumann states, “The new Administration Biden-Harris made a number of promises to be completed in their first 100 days. Among them were large-scale economic initiatives and the targeting of racial disparities. As we are a third way through, it is imperative that we discuss how these initiatives are being implemented and how there can be improvements. Clearly, we are in a crisis within a crisis. Our businesses are suffering, and therefore our families along with it. Sure, many of us have succumbed to the negative effects of the pandemic, but there is one thing I know for sure: as Latinas, if we fall, we rise back up!”

She continues, “We have heard the cries of help within our communities and we want them to know that we are here to help. It is our duty as leaders to extend a helping hand, not only sharing recovery trends and resources but also the support the community needs to come out of this crisis successfully. Please join us in this National Conversation where everybody is welcome to the table.”

Event Agenda

FRIDAY MARCH 19, 2021  – 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm EST 

12:00 pm to 2:00 pm EST- 9:00 am to 11:00 am PST

12:00 -12:05 Welcome by Susana Baumann, President & CEO, Latinas in Business

12:05 – 12:15 Opening Remarks

12:15 – 12:50 Panel 1. Funding and Resources for Latina Small Business Recovery

Context: Using February as a baseline, the analysts found that the sales of Latino-owned businesses dropped 42% in March and April and are down 21% during the 12-month period from Sept. 16, 2019 – Sept. 15, 2020. Even more troubling was the discovery that costs for Latino companies that applied for Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funding have risen higher than their revenues in the ensuing months.

Facilitator: Pilar Avila, Latinas in Business Executive Board Member

12:50 – 1:05 Fireside Chat

Moderator: Susana G Baumann, Pres & CEO

1:05 – 1:45 Panel 2. Trends Impacting Growth in Post-COVID “New Normal”

Context: For small businesses across America, 2020 has been one of the most challenging years in history. Despite the coronavirus pandemic, small business owners have been resilient, pivoting, and adapting their business models to navigate continually changing conditions. We will discuss a few business trends that are likely to dominate in 2021, along with tips on how to position your business for growth.

Facilitator: Beth Marmolejos, Latinas in Business Executive Board Member

1:45 – 1:55 Keynote Speaker: Stacie de Armas

1:55 – 2:00 Closing Remarks

Be sure to register now at Eventbrite. You won’t want to miss it!

Latinas & Power

Latinas & Power Symposium a conference about the value of Latinas in the US

The Latina population in the U.S. grew by an impressive 37% between 2005 and 2015. Today, the value of Latinas continue to increase, especially single mothers becoming breadwinners and the primary decision makers in their homes. One of the main reasons Marilyn Alverio founded Latinas & Power is because early on she understood the great significance of the role of Latinas in this country.

 

Latinas & Power

Ana Violeta Navarro Flores is a Nicaraguan-born American Republican strategist and political commentator for various news outlets, including CNN, CNN en Español, ABC News, Telemundo, and The View.

 

By Guest Contributor Marilyn Alverio

Marilyn Alverio, founder of Latinas & PowerSince 2004, the annual Hartford, CT, Latinas & Power Symposium has monitored the impact of young, self-reliant Latinas who have evolved and are now a powerful force at the helm of the predicted $1.7 trillion Latino purchasing power by 2020.

Currently, she is increasingly likely to be bilingual U.S.-born and as such, Latinas are one of the most sought after consumers targeted by every major company and brand. According to The Nielsen Company’s recent Latina 2.0 Fiscally Conscious, Culturally Influential & Familia Forward report, Latinas are “leading their households both financially and culturally, and she is setting her own standards of community, economics, beauty and style.”

Today, there is no stopping these young women from expanding their imprints on the U.S. economy. She is socially engaged in ways that are personal, regional and national. And, this amazing evolution of Latinas also required the Latinas & Power network to upsurge its annual event to meet Latinas’ current needs.

Celebrating its 15th year, on May 17, 2018, Latinas & Power Symposium® is prepared to meet those necessities. We have packed one-day with mega resources, tools to help women fuel their sense of purpose and determination. In addition, Latinas & Power has invited the most respected and powerful speakers to present professional messages of empowerment and inspiration.  As the largest event in New England focused on Latinas, the organizers have also upped their game to present the most outstanding workshops, panels and sessions and Exhibitor Marketplace.

The Latina population in the U.S. grew by an impressive 37% between 2005 and 2015. Today, Latinas continue to increase their value and significance, especially single mothers becoming breadwinners and the primary decision makers in their homes. At our quinceañera symposium, Latinas & Power will introduce high level professionals of various industries to discuss how Latinas can be fiscally conscious, grow their wealth (job force, entrepreneurship, personal) and expand their paths to impact their personal, regional and national growth and influence.

Ladies, the power is within our reach—and why we personally have taken great strides so that Latinas & Power is up-to-date to teach, guide and demonstrate how to best harness, utilize and embrace the latest reports on Latino consumerism and influence.

 

Latinas & Power

Outstanding speakers at Latinas & Power Symposium May 2018

The reason behind the foundation of Latinas & Power

One of the main reasons I founded Latinas & Power is because early on I understood the great significance of our role as Latinas in this country. It has been a great honor to celebrate Latinas. We’re spiritual, hardworking, loyal consumers, taxpayers, educators, parents, entrepreneurs/job creators, and indispensible Americans—one of the great lessons learned in this great journey is that it takes Latinas to help other mujeres. Only we can give voice to relatable stories of joy, triumph, disappointment, pain and circumstances.

You might be interested: Why Latino economic power is greater than political representation

Women in general have encountered every obstacle imaginable in breaking the glass ceiling in all industries. Latinas, on the other hand are shattering it by continuing to push forward. They are the vanguards to consumer trends and are influencers not only to the total Latino population, but also other consumer groups—leaving their mark o the U.S. mainstream.

 

To register: Latinas & Power Symposium

 

 

Latinas & Power

Latinas & Power celebrates its Quinceañera with outstanding speakers

Marilyn Alverio is the founder and producer of the Latinas and Power Symposium® (LPS), a nationally recognized event that celebrates its 15th anniversary in May 2018. The annual one-day inspirational and professional development platform designed for the Latina on the go presents outstanding speakers this year. 

Latinas & Power

Ana Violeta Navarro Flores is a Nicaraguan-born American Republican strategist and political commentator for various news outlets, including CNN, CNN en Español, ABC News, Telemundo, and The View.

 

By Guest Contributor Marilyn Alverio

Marilyn Alverio, founder of Latinas & Power

Marilyn Alverio, founder of Latinas & Power

Since 2004, the annual Hartford, CT, Latinas & Power Symposium has monitored the impact of young, self-reliant Latinas who have evolved and are now a powerful force at the helm of the predicted $1.7 trillion Latino purchasing power by 2020.

Currently, she is increasingly likely to be bilingual U.S.-born and as such, Latinas are one of the most sought after consumers targeted by every major company and brand. According to The Nielsen Company’s recent Latina 2.0 Fiscally Conscious, Culturally Influential & Familia Forward report, Latinas are “leading their households both financially and culturally, and she is setting her own standards of community, economics, beauty and style.”

Today, there is no stopping these young women from expanding their imprints on the U.S. economy. She is socially engaged in ways that are personal, regional and national. And, this amazing evolution of Latinas also required the Latinas & Power network to upsurge its annual event to meet Latinas’ current needs.

 

Celebrating its 15th year, on May 17, 2018, Latinas & Power Symposium® is prepared to meet those necessities. We have packed one-day with mega resources, tools to help women fuel their sense of purpose and determination. In addition, Latinas & Power has invited the most respected and powerful speakers to present professional messages of empowerment and inspiration.  As the largest event in New England focused on Latinas, the organizers have also upped their game to present the most outstanding workshops, panels and sessions and Exhibitor Marketplace.

The Latina population in the U.S. grew by an impressive 37% between 2005 and 2015. Today, Latinas continue to increase their value and significance, especially single mothers becoming breadwinners and the primary decision makers in their homes. At our quinceañera symposium, Latinas & Power will introduce high level professionals of various industries to discuss how Latinas can be fiscally conscious, grow their wealth (job force, entrepreneurship, personal) and expand their paths to impact their personal, regional and national growth and influence.

Ladies, the power is within our reach—and why we personally have taken great strides so that Latinas & Power is up-to-date to teach, guide and demonstrate how to best harness, utilize and embrace the latest reports on Latino consumerism and influence.

 

Latinas & Power

Outstanding speakers at Latinas & Power Symposium May 2018

The reason behind the foundation of Latinas & Power

One of the main reasons I founded Latinas & Power is because early on I understood the great significance of our role as Latinas in this country. It has been a great honor to celebrate Latinas. We’re spiritual, hardworking, loyal consumers, taxpayers, educators, parents, entrepreneurs/job creators, and indispensible Americans—one of the great lessons learned in this great journey is that it takes Latinas to help other mujeres. Only we can give voice to relatable stories of joy, triumph, disappointment, pain and circumstances.

You might be interested: Why Latino economic power is greater than political representation

Women in general have encountered every obstacle imaginable in breaking the glass ceiling in all industries. Latinas, on the other hand are shattering it by continuing to push forward. They are the vanguards to consumer trends and are influencers not only to the total Latino population, but also other consumer groups—leaving their mark o the U.S. mainstream.

 

To register: Latinas & Power Symposium