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the cost of tardiness

The cost of tardiness in business or the workplace

More often in our overscheduled, overcommitted, and super hyper society, we get to observe tardiness as a constant behavior –however, people do not realize the individual and collective negative consequences of being late.

the cost of tardiness

Do you happen to know someone who always writes “on my way” and is already ten minutes late? Or worse off, always forgets to meet deadlines? I often wonder when does arriving late to meetings, starting events past the appointed time, or simply be untimely, became fashionable? More important – who “made up” that it is acceptable?

When we are late, we show our worst professional skills, lack of emotional intelligence, create bad impressions and horrendous reputations. Tardiness shows that we are disorganized, lack respect of our and others’ time, and poor meticulousness.

A few days ago, I had a meeting with an entrepreneur I am advising. After ten minutes past the scheduled time, she called me to advise she would not be on time. I reminded her that we had scheduled forty-five minutes, as I had a prospective commitment. She tried humoring me, explaining that the reason was that “she had too many goals and very limited time”. She also advised me to be late to my next commitment with my best smile. It is pointless to say, I was completely offended and flabbergasted. Does she realize her wrong doing and the effect her behavior will have in the efficiency, effectiveness and consistency of her business?

As I had lost all my words and became mute, my only come back was to remind her that a major component of rapid growth in business is attributed to carefully cultivating partnerships and collaborations. And, that the best way to assure them was by prioritizing on eradicating all the noise that kept her off track and create dream results from her meetings – by having detailed framework questions, effective time-management and no distractions (including phones and social media).

the cost of tardiness

It is essential to keep in mind that being recognized as untimely and unreliable is negative – and it has a severe personal and professional cost. Tardiness is still a terrible shortcoming. My simple and practical techniques to promote punctuality follow:

  1. Arrive 15 to 30 minutes before the engagement. Others will begin to catch and even copy the positive behavior. You will become the “Master of Punctuality” and believe me, that is a great thing.
  2. If you have a meeting, and the guest arrives late – only provide the person the time remaining in the scheduled time. This will make others eradicate the habit of being late.
  3. Do not change your agenda for the “unpunctual”. If your first commitment is late, ensure to adjust and continue your day as planned. Under no circumstances let you look bad because of the actions of others.
  4. Organize days ahead. If you must submit a presentation in seven days, strategize and make an analysis of how many hours it will take you. Set a goal to have it ready one day ahead of the deadline – scheduling working two or three hours before the set date can do the trick. You never know which situation could arise the day of your deadline.
  5. Prepare for the following day – The night before, have everything you need at the door, on your bag or in the car. Go through the following day in detail and reach out to all the necessary things. This will assure that there are no delays the next morning, right before getting out the door.
  6. Separate time between commitments for calls, emergencies, traffic, lack of parking – these are events which, on average, take 20 percent of our days.

Remember that time is one of the most important human capitals we have – and is worth a lot, although it is in danger of extinction. The key is to get organized, and remember the negative effect tardiness has on our reputation and future opportunities.

 

 

 

business accelerator Access Latina

Access Latina announces business accelerator for Latina entrepreneurs in STEAM

Access Latina, a business accelerator for Latina-owned firms headquartered in Florida, New York, Massachusetts, Texas, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico, launched its second cohort to compete for a chance at more than $100K in capital and resources for Latinas to grow their businesses.

business accelerator Access Latina

Access Latina official launch in New York City

Access Latina announced the details for its second round of applications at the Golden Seeds Headquarters in New York City, along with cross collaboration initiatives with the Stanford Latino Entrepreneur Leaders Program to continue to grow the database of U.S. Latino-owned companies, Meredith Corporation’s Siempre Mujer Magazine as a part of their ‘Projects That Can Change the World’ initiative, and Lili Gil Valletta, creator of Dreamers Ventures and HSN partner to Project American Dreams to select up to three semifinalists to access the fast-track program and be among the twenty semifinalists of HSN’s Project American Dreams.

CNNMoney writer and editor, Octavio Blanco, conducted a question and answer session with the 2016 finalists and one of the winners, New York-based Francesca Kennedy, owner and founder of IX Style and TEDx resident.

“We are focused on finding ways to fill the gaps Latina business owners face, such as limited access to capital and mentorship. We strive to propel high-growth Latina entrepreneurs and create a network of successful trailblazers. As we’ve seen with our 2016 alumni and their remarkable achievements, latina women represent key engines of economic growth,” says Lucienne Gigante, co-founder of Access Latina, adding that according to the most recent State of Women-Owned Businesses Report by American Express, Latina-owned businesses created over 550,400 jobs and contributed over $97 billion in revenues to the U.S. economy in 2015.

Some of last year’s finalists went on to compete at Project Runway: Fashion Startup a Lifetime Reality TV show, were profiled by Forbes and TIME, and got a chance to launch a line with renowned business woman and designer, Rebecca Minkoff. The finalists in year one together generated over $1.2 million in revenue.

business accelerator

(L to R) Lucienne Gigante, Octavio Munoz, CNN Money, Marta Michelle Colon

To participate, the Latina entrepreneurs need to own at least 20% of an early-stage company in the industries of STEAM, social innovation and agriculture. Up to ten finalists and up to five winners are selected by independent judges and will receive:

  • A three-day acceleration module “Growth Spark” with global leaders
  • The opportunity to present their business to Golden Seeds.
  • Access to seed capital in the form of a grant, crowdfunding rounds with Kiva Zip, and/or direct traditional and non-traditional investment.
  • Connection to a network of advisors, sponsors, and mentors.
  • The opportunity to collaborate with other business owners going through the same journey.
  • The opportunity to win a $25k grant

“Research continues to validate that Latinas are an under-tapped force and make successful entrepreneurs. They are achieving innovative endeavors, while actively fueling the economy. This is the reason and passion behind Access Latina, to drive Latina entrepreneurs’ economic potential by opening new channels to capital, resources, and knowledge. Empowering Latina entrepreneurs is good for the economy and has a positive impact in our society,” says Marta Michelle Colon, Co-Founder of Access Latina.

For more information about Access Latina or to apply to the business acceleration platform please visit www.accesslatina.org. To join the conversation online please use #AccessLatina2017 and follow us @AccessLatina.

Join the conversation: #AccessLatina2017        @AccessLatina

Members of the AccessLatina accelerator

AccessLatina and LatinasinBusiness.us announce media strategic partnership

A strategic media partnership to help promote and expand their reach among Latina business owners was announced by AccessLatina, the first non-profit organization pioneering entrepreneurial growth for Latinas in STEAM, social innovation, or the agricultural industry, and LatinasinBusiness.com. a digital platform advocating for the economic empowerment of Latinas in business and the workplace.

Members of the AccessLatina accelerator strategic media partnership

Members of the AccessLatina accelerator

Recently, AccessLatina announced its round of finalists for the first-ever multi-market accelerator program developed to reach one of America’s fastest growing populations—Latinas—in STEAM, social innovation and agriculture. The finalists, Latina business owners from New York, Washington DC, Florida and Puerto Rico, are competing for the opportunity to receive more than $100,000 in capital and resources to expand their businesses.

“We are excited to add LatinasinBusiness.us to our strong group of collaborators in the private and public sector to provide resources to high-growth Latina entrepreneurs,” said Lucienne Gigante, co-founder of AccessLatina. “Our finalists will benefit from the exposure as they continue to grow their businesses and create new alliances,” added co-founder Maria Michelle Colón.

Both organizations have Latina entrepreneurs and innovators as their core target group, to help them promote, expand and grow their businesses.

Founded by two female entrepreneurs, Lucienne Gigante and Marta Michelle Colón, AccessLatina aims to provide capital injection and resource investment through a yearly competition to women-owned businesses focused on STEAM, social innovation, or the agricultural industry (including ag-farm and ag-tech). Potential candidates need to be doing business for at least three years and show high-growth potential.

Susana Baumann editor-in-chief LIBizus strategic media partnership

Susana Baumann editor-in-chief LIBizus

LatinasinBusiness.us was founded by Susana G. Baumann as an initiative of her company LCSWorldwide, a multicultural marketing communications consulting firm in business for over 20 years. What she calls her “work of love” is a digital space for Latinas who want to share their concerns, expertise, strategies and achievements, promote their products or services, attract customers, learn about social media, seek business advice, be a “madrina,” become a minority vendor or find business to business trade opportunities.

“This media strategic partnership seemed natural as we complete each other’s vision by providing access to capital and knowledge, networking contacts and the opportunity to promote their businesses locally and nationally through social media. These are the toughest tasks for busy Latinas who are running their businesses with small budgets and limited resources,” said Susana G. Baumann, LatinasinBusiness.us Editor-in-Chief.

The media strategic partnership will include covering AccessLatina events, announcements and activities, and promoting Latina business owners who participate in their annual competition through LatinasinBusiness.us platform and its social media channels.

Since inception, Baumann’s initiative has received the attention and support of Latino and Latina leaders around the country becoming a media strategic partner with the New America Alliance (NAA) American Latina Leadership Caucus, the Statewide Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of New Jersey, the Greater Washington Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, the MCRCC Hispanic Business Council, and the Hispanic Chamber of E-Commerce. Baumann is also a member of the USHCC Foundation “At the Table” Women in Business and Leadership initiative.

Please visit and follow LatinasinBusiness.us , @LIBizus #WeAreLIBizus and Facebook.

AccessLatina is a non-for profit organization 501(c)(3) pioneering entrepreneurial growth for Latinas in diverse sectors through an accelerator and mentorship program. To be part of the #ACCESSLATINA experience, please use #FUNDLATINAS on social media or visit www.accesslatina.org for more information on the program.

Follow on social media AccessLatina on Facebook and @AccessLatina on Twitter.

AccessLatinas finalist with co-founders Lucienne Gigante and Marta Michelle

8 Latina business owners finalists for AccessLatina accelerator

AccessLatinas finalist with co-founders Lucienne Gigante and Marta Michelle

AccessLatina finalists with co-founders Lucienne Gigante and Marta Michelle-Colon

AccessLatina announced the names of eight Latina business owners chosen as finalists for its accelerator competition. Together, they generated more than $1.2 million in revenue during the last two years.

AccessLatina, the first multi-market accelerator program designed to help Latina business owners in various sectors reach their entrepreneurial and economic potential, announced its last round of eight finalists competing for $25,000 grants.

Chosen by a panel of over 40 judges, the selected Latinas in business have already shown success with the help of technology and a positive impact in building opportunities for underserved community around their served geographical areas.

AccessLatina co-founder Lucienne Gigante told LIBizus that she is very excited about this opportunity to work with a diverse group of Latina business owners with high growth profiles. “We were impressed by the level of innovation and creativity of these Latino women,” she said. Although the group has generated $1.2 million in revenue in the last two years, the companies’ scale remains small –less than 25 employees.

“Latina-owned businesses have increased nearly 200 percent over the past decade and we want to help them grow through access to mentorship, networks and opportunities,” added co-founder Marta Michelle Colón.

In fact, renowned global entrepreneurship and innovation professor Antonio Dávila hosted a one-day seminar on the challenges in managing startup growth for the finalists of the 501(c)3 accelerator. The seminar was hosted at District Cowork in Manhattan, New York.

Francesca Kennedy, AccessLatina finalist

Francesca Kennedy, AccessLatina finalist

They discussed examining the management challenges of a startup as it moves from the entrepreneurial to the growth stage, similarly to the stage of their business. The seminar, based on Professor Dávila’s book, “Building Sustainable High Growth Startup Companies: Management Systems as Accelerators,” examines how to best address the management needs of a growing business.

“It is very interesting to work with people like these Latina business owners who are enthusiastic about building companies and organizations that are helpful to society, said Professor Dávila. “It has been a pleasure to be a part of a non for profit helping women achieve their goals,” added Dávila.

And the selected Latina business owners are:

Francesca Kennedy’s artisan sandals donate clean drinking water to children in Guatemala for every purchase made. Francesca has been featured by Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar. Her sandals have been worn by A-listers such as Gwyneth Paltrow, Amanda Seyfried, and Rachel Roy, among others, and has collaborated with top brands such as GAP, Anthropology, and J Crew.

Victoria Flores, AccessLatina finalist Latina business owner

Victoria Flores, AccessLatina finalist

Victoria Flores, a former Morgan Stanley executive, and Leslie Namad’s launched the first ever affordable and luxury hair extension and beauty product subscription box. They are also the founders of Press On Hair by SOBE Organics, sold at mass retail, and have pitched on Shark Tank. Flores is on-set for the 2016 Housewives of New York of Bravo.

Michelle Perez Kenderish’s e-commerce platform feature independent designers, makers, collectives and local brands. She’s also the founder of ChicaPReneurs, a monthly meetup and platform for collaboration that brings together creative entrepreneurs and cultural innovators from Puerto Rico living abroad.

Trina Bardusco’s digital branded content company specializing in women. She’s also the creator of the documentary series, Wanderlust. Her original web series’ for Yahoo Mujer that ran from 2008-2014, boasted 25 million unique monthly visitors, and came in second to People en Español’s most trafficked site by Latinas in the U.S.

Catherine Lajara’s clinical and pharmaceutical research company aims to reduce disparities in clinical trials and runs trials for pharmaceutical companies looking to develop new treatments. Lajara had very few connections and savings when she launched her business. The company today has five clinical studies. Lajara is passionate about health equity, women’s leadership, entrepreneurship and community development.

Matilsha Marxuach, AccessLatina finalist Latina business owner

Matilsha Marxuach, AccessLatina finalist

Matilsha Marxuach’s marketplace for fair-trade, environmentally responsible, and local artisanal tote bags has a mission of practicing sustainability.  Marxuach is a designer and entrepreneur who’s inspiration comes from local culture as well as from traditional lifestyles and knowledge. She also serves as an avid advocate of the concepts of fair trade and local consumption.

Cindy Cruz’ agricultural business to export exotic and natural goods grown locally in Puerto Rico. Cruz has made it her mission to use innovation and sustainable agriculture to advance local crops.

Sacha Delgado’s full immersion and cultural language school. Delgado is an educational entrepreneur and is the Co-Founder of a Waldorf Inspired School.

In addition to the finalists, and as part of AccessLatina’s alliance with Puerto Rico’s entrepreneurship show hit3001.com, AccessLatina awarded a spot in the Advanced Education Module, for Decennia Vega’s Semila, LLC- a company dedicated to the wholesale of clones of cocoa trees. 

Selection criteria for AccessLatina accelerator

AccessLatina’s criteria for selection included owning at least a 20 percent share in businesses within STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Math), social innovation and urban agriculture industries (including ag-farm and ag-tech) that are headquartered in New York, Washington, D.C., Florida and Puerto Rico.

The finalists will receive three Advanced Education Modules with top global leaders. Then, the judges will select up to five winners that will receive a $25,000 grant and a crowd-funding round, publicity, mentoring and access to a high-profile network of professionals including entrepreneurs and investors.

AccessLatina is composed of a group of dedicated social and business entrepreneurs and is supported by Georgetown University’s McDonough Graduate School of Business, Kiva Zip, Athena Center for Leadership Studies at Barnard College, Golden Seeds, Guayacán, the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce, Oriental Bank and the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative, among others.

 

Members of the AccessLatina accelerator

AccessLatina launches accelerator for economic empowerment of Latinas in STEAM

 

Members of the AccessLatina accelerator

Members of the AccessLatina accelerator

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY

 AccessLatina, a non-for-profit organization pioneering entrepreneurial growth for women, announces the launch of the first-ever multi-market accelerator program developed to reach one of America’s fastest growing populations—Latinas—in STEAM, social innovation and agriculture.

The organization parallels the passion, authenticity and cultural roots that Latinas proudly share. The accelerator was launched by two female entrepreneurs: Lucienne Gigante and Marta Michelle Colón. It is open to Latinas who own businesses headquartered in New York, Washington, DC, Florida, and Puerto Rico, focused on STEAM, social innovation, or the agricultural industry (including ag-farm and ag-tech), and have been doing business for at least three years.

According to the American Express State of Women-Owned Businesses 2014 report, women in the continental U.S. are opening an average of 1,200 businesses a day, double the rate from three years ago. Women-owned businesses generate more than $1.4 trillion in revenue and employ more than 7.9 million people.

Latinas in particular are paving the way by opening businesses six to one above other market segments, proving to play an instrumental role in unleashing the potential of the American economy. Over the past decade there has been a nearly 200 percent increase in Latina-owned businesses. 

“Studies show that Latina business owners have a startup rate of six times the national average. Latinas hold amazing possibilities to create employment, exports and continue to significantly impact the economy,” said Marta Michelle Colón.

AccessLatina aims to provide capital injection and resource investment to women-owned businesses with high-growth potential through a yearly competition for which applications are being accepted starting immediately at www.accesslatina.org.

AccessLatina will provide capital and resources to Latina entrepreneurs, including a $25,000 grant and a crowd-funding round, advanced education, publicity, mentoring and access to a high-profile network of professionals, other entrepreneurs and investors.  

The accelerator comprises three modules taught by top professors and experts on topics including management, sales, marketing, investors, business plans, and mentoring sessions. Ten finalists will be chosen by more than 40 judges participating in the process.

“Investing in women’s economic development is a significant economic driver for any country,” said Lucienne Gigante.

AccessLatina is supported by McDonough Graduate School of Business of Georgetown University, Kiva Zip, Athena Center for Leadership Studies at Barnard College, Golden Seeds, Guayacán, the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce, Oriental Bank, and Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative, among others, and consists of a group of dedicated social and business entrepreneurs.

To be part of the #ACCESSLATINA experience or for more information on the program and details of the application process please visit www.accesslatina.org. Follow on social media  @AccessLatina on Facebook and @AccessLatina on Twitter. Please use #FUNDLATINAS on social media.

 

Key Dates:

Accelerator’s deadline to submit applications is

November 28, 2015

 The 10 finalists will be announced on

January 4, 2016

 The five winners will be announced on:

March 28, 2016