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Learn how Hispanic businesses are pivoting post-pandemic in today’s SBA virtual event

Join the SBA today, October 14 , 2021 from 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EDT to learn how Hispanic businesses are pivoting post-pandemic. 

Hispanic Heritage Month is a time dedicated each year to celebrating the successes and accomplishments of Hispanic individuals. As the fastest growing population in the U.S., the Hispanic population is a powerhouse with the ability to shape our nation’s future economy and market.

Along with the population, Latino small businesses are growing too. The 2020 State of Latino Entrepreneurship Report revealed that the number of Latino-owned businesses has grown 34% over the last 10 years compared to just 1% for all other small businesses.

Today, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month with virtual event: Testimonies of Excellence & Pride (Excelencia y Orgullo).The event will celebrate the accomplishments of Hispanic business owners as they share their stories of facing adversity and challenges on their way to success. 

Beginning at noon, the event will open with a panel discussion where SBA Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman will lead a discussion with Hispanic business owners to hear how they have successfully pivoted and adapted throughout the pandemic. Panelists will share truths of how they have overcome challenges, and how they face this adversity with “grit and ganas (a drive to succeed)”. Following this discussion, SBA Associate Administrators Bibi Hidalgo and Mark Madrid will have a candid talk with Hispanic business leader Ana Valdez, executive president of The Latino Donor Collaborative, about the state of Hispanic entrepreneurship in the United States.

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month and learn how Hispanic businesses are pivoting post-pandemic. (Photo credit: SBA)

Register Now: Testimonies of Excellence & Pride (Excelencia y Orgullo)Today October 14, 2021 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EDT

 “Over the past 18 months, our nation’s 32 million small businesses and innovative startups have faced unprecedented adversity and shown incredible resilience. However, Latinx entrepreneurs -– despite starting businesses faster than at any other time in our history –continue to struggle because of historic inequities and persistent barriers to the capital, networks, and markets they need to sustain and grow their businesses. As a former entrepreneur myself, I understand what a difference we can make by building equity, breaking down barriers, and bringing new investments and opportunities to historically underserved communities,” said  SBA Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman in a press release. “As we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, let us continue to embrace the extraordinary entrepreneurial spirit and rising achievement of America’s Latinx communities and the innovative spark they bring to countless industrial centers, innovation hubs, and Main Streets by helping them start, grow and thrive.”

About the U.S. Small Business Administration

The U.S. Small Business Administration makes the American dream of business ownership a reality. As the only go-to resource and voice for small businesses backed by the strength of the federal government, the SBA empowers entrepreneurs and small business owners with the resources and support they need to start, grow or expand their businesses, or recover from a declared disaster. It delivers services through an extensive network of SBA field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov.

Maya Jacquez shares Mexican food culture and heritage through The Pinole Project 

The Pinole Project is a Mexican-American Food Company, founded by Maya Jacquez and her family as an homage to their abuela, Adela Jacquez, and her recipes. Growing up, Maya would visit her grandparents’ humble ranch in Mexico where her grandmother made the family her Pinole Chia Oatmeal. This recipe inspired the company’s first product, inviting the world to their family table to share their heritage, culture, and history with others. 

The Pinole Project, Pinole Project, PinoleProject

The Most Satisfying Vegan Weight Loss Breakfast!

Sharing Mexican culture and family heritage through food 

Founded in January 2020, The Pinole Project took just over 1 year to go from product idea to being available online and nationwide. The project grew from the family’s overwhelming passion to share their abuela’s recipe with the world. Homemade versions of Adela’s Pinole Chia Oatmeal were a regular morning staple in the Jacquez family to fuel their days. 

“Our family has been eating Pinole for centuries, and our abuela Adela would add Pinole into many dishes for more protein and fiber,” said Maya. 

A strong and mighty woman herself, Adela would always say, “Pinole will make you strong.”

The Pinole Project

The Pinole Project pays homage to the family’s abuela, Adela Jacquez and her recipe. (Photo courtesy Maya Jacquez)

The Aztec Superfood is enjoyed all across Latin America and has a rich history in the region. Pinole is a grain made from dried heirloom corn that is then ground and mixed with spices, such as cinnamon. Sometimes chia seeds or sweeteners, such as piloncillo (unrefined whole cane sugar) are also added. 

Once used to fuel Aztec warriors, Pinole is still a source of strength for locals. Today Pinole is eaten by the Tarahumara, an indigenous community living in Northern Mexico. Tarahumara runners are known for their long-distance running abilities. Maya’s grandfather, Arsenio Jacquez, developed a close relationship with the Tarahumara people and served as an interpreter for them for many decades. 

The Pinole Project

Their abuela’s Pinole Chia Oatmeal recipe inspired the company’s first product, inviting the world to their family table. (Photo courtesy Maya Jacquez)

“Our family finds so much strength in being able to share our heritage and culture with the world. The Pinole Project’s mission is to build bridges by sharing Mexican food, history, and culture. We grow when we invite new friends to our table. We believe when we educate the world about Mexico, that we are creating meaningful bonds.”

Overcoming challenges as new entrepreneurs 

With their ‘aha’ moment and the desire to share their grandmother’s recipe with the world, Maya and her family began their journey into entrepreneurship. 

One of their biggest obstacles starting out was finding the right partners to help with manufacturing, ingredient sourcing, and fulfillment. It took many months of conversations and due diligence to make sure they had the right team to succeed.

“It’s very important to have reliable, trustworthy partners because there are so many steps to getting a product in someone’s hands!” said Maya. 

As new entrepreneurs, seeking out entrepreneurial friends and mentors was another strength in overcoming obstacles. Having people who have already been down this road is an invaluable asset to anyone starting out. 

“Entrepreneurship is extremely challenging, especially in the early days (we’re still in this phase). Not only does it help to have peers and mentors to whom you can ask questions and seek guidance, but also there’s comfort in knowing you’re not alone in your journey.”

Despite the early challenges, the rewards have been worth it. Being able to share her family’s culture and heritage through their products has fostered a community that feels a lot like family. 

The High Protein/Fiber Aztec Superfood You’ve Been Missing in Your Life

“We always love seeing our fans and customers send us photos of their oatmeal. We have one supporter in particular whose love and passion for our product makes us feel so happy and eager to achieve success!” Maya shared. “She makes 3-5 Baked Oats recipes per week (consistently for many months now) with our Pinole Chia Oatmeal! Baked Oats is oatmeal made in the oven. It tastes like a delicious, healthy cake (we are obsessed!).”

The Pinole Project, Mexican Food, chocolate pancake recipe

Feeling groggy in the morning? Unfocused? Try this Aztec superfood breakfast recipe and get more!

From a small ranch in Mexico, one family’s recipe has built bridges, creating a community of people who love and celebrate an ancient grain and continue to pass on it’s history to new generations and cultures across the country. 

You might be interested: Mexican roots-inspired Adriana Pavon, fashion designer, and indigenous rights advocate

Pinole Project, PinoleProject, The Pinole Project

“My grandparents showed me what it means to live a meaningful life. They worked so hard on their small ranch in Chihuahua, Mexico to make ends meet. Preserving my family’s legacy and perpetuating Mexican-American food, history, and culture are incredibly important to me.”  

Stay Full & Focused all Morning with this Vegan, Gluten-Free Breakfast!

What you should be reading and watching this Hispanic Heritage Month 

Hispanic Heritage Month is a time to celebrate and recognize the accomplishments and talents of Hispanic Americans. First established 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson, it was later expanded in 1988 to cover a 30-day period by President Ronald Reagan. 

The month honors Hispanic achievements and also celebrates the independence of various Latin American countries, such as Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mexico and Chile. 

Another area of focus is celebrating Hispanic art and culture. Hispanic culture is diverse and vibrant, with each country bringing their own unique traditions and style. From literature to film and arts, Hispanic Americans have contributed greatly to American culture producing stunning and thought-provoking works. 

To honor Hispanic Heritage Month, here are a few books and films by Hispanic creators to celebrate and educate. 

Books to read this Hispanic Heritage Month 

For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts by Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodríguez  

The founder of Latina Rebels and a “Latinx Activist You Should Know”(Teen Vogue) arms women of color with the tools and knowledge they need to find success on their own terms. — Google Books 

In For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts, Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodríguez  offers wisdom and a liberating path forward for all women of color. She crafts powerful ways to address the challenges Brown girls face, from imposter syndrome to colorism. She empowers women to decolonize their worldview, and defy “universal” white narratives, by telling their own stories. Her book guides women of color toward a sense of pride and sisterhood and offers essential tools to energize a movement. 

Living Beyond Borders by Margarita Longoria

 In this mixed-media collection of short stories, personal essays, poetry, and comics, this celebrated group of authors share the borders they have crossed, the struggles they have pushed through, and the two cultures they continue to navigate as Mexican Americans. Living Beyond Borders is at once an eye-opening, heart-wrenching, and hopeful love letter from the Mexican American community to today’s young readers. 

A powerful exploration of what it means to be Mexican American. — Google Books 

Postcolonial Love Poem by Natalie Diaz 

Winner of the 2021 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry, Natalie Diaz weaves together her Latina and Indigenous identity in a collection of tender, heart-wrenching and defiant poems that are an anthem against erasure of people like herself.

Postcolonial Love Poem is a timely piece that explores various aspects of identity and life as a Latina and Indigenous woman in America today and what it means to love and be loved in an America troubled by conflict and racial injustice.

Latinx Art: Artists, Markets, and Politics by Arlene Dávila  

 In Latinx Art Arlene Dávila draws on numerous interviews with artists, dealers, and curators to explore the problem of visualizing Latinx art and artists. Providing an inside and critical look of the global contemporary art market, Dávila’s book is at once an introduction to contemporary Latinx art and a call to decolonize the art worlds and practices that erase and whitewash Latinx artists. Dávila shows the importance of race, class, and nationalism in shaping contemporary art markets while providing a path for scrutinizing art and culture institutions and for diversifying the art world. — Google Books 

You might be interested: 10 Books by Latinx authors to read summer 2021 

Hispanic Cultural films to watch 

In the Heights – In the Heights is a celebration of Hispanic culture and community set against the backdrop of Washington Heights. The film weaves together the stories of various members of the community, telling a tale of love, family, friendship, and culture. 

Lights up for In the Heights, a joyous celebration of heritage and community fueled by dazzling direction and singalong songs.” —Rotten Tomatoes 

Coco – A movie for the whole family, Disney’s Coco tells the story of a young boy in a fictional Mexican village who dreams of becoming a famous musician like his idol. The moving coming-of-age story celebrates culture and family in a fun-loving, heartfelt tale about learning from our elders. 

Frida – Celebrating a cultural icon, Frida tells the bold and controversial life of artist Frida Kahlo. The biopic chronicles the artist’s life, starting in Mexico City, and explores her relationships, politics, and art in a poignant and moving film. 

 

The Graduates – This documentary mini-series explores the many issues in education today through the eyes of six Latino and Latina students from across the United States, shining a necessary light on the hardships Latinx students face. 

“These student profiles offer a first-hand perspective on the challenges facing many Latino high school students, including over-crowded schools, crime-ridden neighborhoods, teen pregnancy and pressure to contribute to the family finances.” — IMDB

The series can be viewed on PBS.

Hispanic Heritage Month: Celebrating and honoring the contributions of Hispanic Americans

Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated each year from September 15th to October 15th in the United States. The month is a celebration of Hispanic Heritage and  a time to recognize and honor the contributions of Hispanic Americans in the nation’s history, culture, and achievements. 

The history and why we celebrate 

National Hispanic Heritage Month began in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson.  Twenty years later in 1988 it was expanded to cover a 30-day period by President Ronald Reagan. 

Many who are unfamiliar with Hispanic Heritage Month often wonder why the celebration begins in the middle of September rather than at the beginning. September 15th was chosen as the start date to recognize and commemorate the anniversary of  the independence day for various Latin American countries. 

September 15th marks the independence of five Hispanic countries who declared their independence in 1821: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Additionally, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on September 16th and September 18th, respectively. 

Hispanic Heritage Month

Photo by sydney Rae on Unsplash

In addition to recognizing the independence of various Latin American countries, the month is a celebration of Hispanic accomplishment. We celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month as a reminder of all that Hispanic Americans have achieved and helped shape the nation. 

“Our communities are represented by Hispanic elected officials, and our children are taught by Hispanic teachers.  Our future will be shaped by Hispanic engineers who are working to develop new technology that will help us grasp our clean energy future and by the skilled union workers who are going to build it,” said President Biden in White House proclamation

The U.S. Hispanic population is a powerhouse that continues to grow to new heights. According to the 2020 census data, the Hispanic population reached 62.1 million, or 18.7% of the total population in 2020. Additionally, the 2020 State of Latino Entrepreneurship Report conducted by Stanford Graduate School of Business in collaboration with the Latino Business Action Network revealed that the number of Latino-owned businesses has grown 34% over the last 10 years compared to just 1% for all other small businesses. Were it not for the growth in the number of Latino-owned firms, the total number of small businesses in the U.S. would actually have declined between 2007 and 2012.

“National Hispanic Heritage Month is an important reminder of how much strength we draw as a Nation from our immigrant roots and our values as a Nation of immigrants,” President Biden continued. 

Ways to observe Hispanic Heritage Month 

Hispanic Heritage Month can be observed in many ways. As a celebration of culture and history, individuals can honor the month by engaging with Hispanic created content such as books, films, music, and more. The National Hispanic Heritage Month website, hosted by The Library of Congress, offers many activities, events, and resources to help celebrate and educate. 

Another way to honor the month is to support Hispanic-owned small businesses. Minority small businesses have suffered the most in the past year due to the COVID-19 global pandemic. Many Hispanic-owned businesses struggled to stay afloat or are still struggling. Supporting these businesses helps put money back into the community and honor the work of Hispanic Americans, ensuring that these businesses will continue. 

You might be interested: 10 Books by Latinx authors to read summer 2021 

Hispanic Heritage Month asks us to look around and take in all that Hispanic Americans have achieved, both in history and today. It asks us to remember we are a diverse and extraordinary community. It asks us to be visible and speak our history. We celebrate by remembering. We celebrate by learning. We celebrate by supporting.

Puerto Rican Chamber of Palm Beach Florida

Preserving Hispanic Heritage by protecting financial well-being

Puerto Rican Chamber of Palm Beach Florida

The Puerto Rican Hispanic Chamber of Commerce for Palm Beach County  &  our Host WPTV News Channel 5   cordially invites you to our Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration Date: Thursday September 24, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:30 PM.

Guest Speaker:

Ms. Shana Peterson-Sheptak Senior Vice President & Regional Manager at PNC Bank

 “Preserving your Hispanic Heritage by protecting your Financial Well-Being”

On this evening we will be recognizing the Achievements of our Hispanic Community. Address: WPTV News Channel 5 1100 Banyan Blvd, West Palm Beach, FL 33401.

Admission: Members: Free Non-Members $5.00  Complimentary Beverages & Hors D’oeuvres! sponsored by Dina Rubio at Don Ramon Restaurant Bring your Business Cards & I.D. to register to vote at this event. For more information please contact the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Chamber at (561)889-6527

CLN Hall of Fame October 1

Chicago Latino Network Hall of Fame Reception

CNL Hall of Fame Reception

Join us for Cocktails and Accolades, as we honor awardees of the past nine CLN Awards, and celebrate those who have surpassed excellence by inducting them into the CLN Hall of Fame!Complimentary hosted bar featuring specialty cocktails by Hendrick’s Gin, Milagro Tequila and Reyka Vodka.All tickets include complimentary hosted bar and appetizers.General admission: $40 per ticket
VIP booth (seats 10 VIPs): $500 (limited availability)
VIP booth (seats 6 VIPs): $300 (limited availability)

Come and celebrate with the following distinguished CLN Award recipients, and find out who will be inducted into the Inaugural CLN Hall of Fame!

Pablo Acosta – CCO – PACO [cross-cultural marketing]

Anita Alvarez – Cook County State’s Attorney

David Andalcio – CEO – Wynndalco Enterprises, LLC

Juan Carlos Avila – Managing Partner – TOROSO Investments, LLC

Karina Ayala-Bermejo – EVP & GC Metropolitan Family Services; Executive Director, Legal Aid Society of Metropolitan Family Services

Martin Cabrera, Jr. – Chief Executive Officer – Cabrera Capital Markets, LLC

Olga Camargo – Managing Partner – TOROSO Investments, LLC

Alberto A. Carrero, Jr. – Member – Chicago Board of Education

Gery J. Chico – Partner – Chico & Nunes, P.C.

Warner Cruz – President & CEO – J.C. Restoration, Inc.

Concepcion “Connie” Favela – Nursing Care Plan Coordinator – Lutheran Social Services of Illinois

Sol Flores – Executive Director – La Casa Norte

Henry Godinez – Professor – Department of Theatre – Northwestern University; Resident Artistic Associate – Goodman Theatre

Alicia Gonzalez – Executive Director – Chicago Run

Angel Gutierrez – Vice President – Community Development and Outreach Services – Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Chicago

Clara Lopez – Vice President – El Valor

Maria E. Lopez – Principal – Maria Esther Lopez & Associates

Heriberto Martinez – Best Buy Carpet & Granite

Juan Ochoa – President & CEO – Miramar International Group

Diana Palomar – Vice President, Community Affairs – ABC 7 Chicago

Sunny Penedo Chico – President and Founder of SPC Educational Solutions

Guillermo “Bill” Perez – Director, Hispanic Outreach Program – Chicago Board of Elections Commissioners

Robert Renteria – Chairman – The Barrio Foundation

Arabel Alva Rosales – CEO & President – AAR & Assocs., Ltd.

Zoraida Sambolin – Weekday Edition co-anchor – NBC5 News Today

Jose Sanchez – President & CEO – Norwegian American Hospital

Sam Sanchez – President – Samco Enterprises

Monica Torres-Linares – Managing Counsel at Justicia Attorneys/Abogados

Israel Vargas – Asst. Provost for College Access and Targeted Recruitment Programs – Roosevelt University

Neli Vazquez-Rowland – President – ASafeHaven

Letty Velez – President & CEO – Velez Enterprises