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15 Best Latin American soup recipes to try this winter!

Who doesn’t love a nice hot bowl of soup on a chilly winter’s day? As the temperatures continue to drop in the Northern Hemisphere, we at Latinas in Business are looking to cozy up with our favorite Latin American soup recipes.  

All around the world, soup is enjoyed by every culture. Soups come in all different styles, from chunky, clear, to creamy, and can be served hot or cold. Today, we’re focusing on our favorite hot soups from around Latin America. 

With January being National Soup Month, it’s the perfect time to indulge. Celebrate the month by trying out some of these recipes and sharing them with your loved ones. 

5 Latin American soup recipes in three different styles

Latin American soup

Sopa de Sancocho. (Photo source: dominicancooking.com)

Sancocho

Traditionally, Sancocho is a meat-and-roots-based stew. It can be found in various Latin American countries, especially the Caribbean, and comes in different variations depending on the country. Some of the key ingredients include meat, vegetables, broth, yuca, and platano. This hearty soup will make the perfect winter meal!

Recipes for Sancocho

  • Try it the Dominican way with Tía Clara’s recipe at Dominican Cooking, the oldest and largest Dominican cooking website. 
  • Another variation comes from Panamá. This version is similar to chicken soup. See the recipe here
  • Finally, another delicious version to try is Venezuela’s variation. This recipe from La Cocina Latina uses beef for a flavorful and filling meal that will satisfy the whole family. 
Latin American soup

Sopa de Mondongo. (Photo source: mycolombianrecipes.com)

Sopa de Mondongo

Sopa de Mondongo is popular throughout Latina America and the Caribbean. The soup consists of tripe as the main meat and a variety of vegetables. In the Colombian tradition, the soup also includes other meats such as pork and chorizo. In Colombia, Mondongo is served as a complete meal, accompanied by white rice, avocado, banana and drizzled with lime juice.

Recipes for Mondongo 

Latin American soups

Caldo de Res. (Photo source: maricruzavalos.com)

Caldo de Res

Caldo de Res, also known as Cocido, is a hearty soup made with beef meat and bones. The versatile soup includes many variations throughout Latin America in countries such as Mexico, Honduras, and Guatemala. 

This recipe is the perfect comfort soup, especially if you’re not feeling well. Made with beef bones and vegetables, this recipe has many health benefits such as calcium, potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus. Marrow bones also provide Omega-3, vitamin A, vitamin K2, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc among others.

So, if you’re looking for a soup to revitalize your strength, this is definitely one to try! 

Recipes for Caldo de Res

You might be interested: 5 hearty autumnal vegan meals to try this month

Sopa de Pescado. (Photo source: quericavida.com)

Sopa de Pescado 

Sopa de Pescado is a fish soup that can be made in various styles depending on the country. In Perú, the dish is called Chilcano de pescado and is made with fish fillet, herbs, vegetables, and a rich broth. In Cuba, the heads of fish are used and pieces of bread or rice are added to the soup and in Costa Rica noodles and potatoes are added. 

Recipes for Sopa de Pescado

Ecuadorian style Locro. (Photo source: laylita.com)

Locro

Locro is a thick and creamy soup popular in countries such as Argentina, Ecuador, and Paraguay. The Argentinian version is made with calabaza—or acorn or butternut squash, corn, beans and meat. In Ecuador, the soup is made with potatoes and cheese, creating a creamy and thick potato soup. The Paraguay version is similar to the Argentinian style, though it does not contain any squash. 

Recipes for Locro

Dia de los Reyes

How Dia de los Reyes traditions vary between countries…and best Rosca recipe!

Dia de los Reyes, or Three Kings Day, is a Latino and Hispanic holiday that takes place on January 6th, also known as the Epiphany. 

The history behind the day honors the Three Wise Men and the biblical story of how they traveled for twelve days to give gifts to baby Jesus. The three Kings, named Melchior, Caspar, and Balthazar followed a star across the desert to deliver symbolic gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. 

For many, the holiday is known as a “second Christmas” and traditionally it is the day when Hispanic households exchange gifts, concluding the Christmas holiday festivities. 

Originally, Christmas was celebrated for more than just one day, with the holiday spanning twelve days following December 25th and concluding on January 6th. You may be familiar with the holiday song The Twelve Days of Christmas. This song describes those twelve days, when many would traditionally give gifts throughout the long holiday, concluding with the Epiphany where the most gifts were given. 

For Latino and Hispanic households, the Epiphany is celebrated with just as much spirit as others celebrate Christmas on December 25th. While the tradition originated in Spain, many Latin American countries have adapted those traditions with their own twists and cultural inspiration. 

Dia de los Reyes traditions by country 

Depending on where you’re from, Dia de los Reyes traditions may vary, but one aspect that remains the same is gift-giving. Similar to Christmas traditions, children anticipate the arrival of the Three Kings like others anticipate Santa Claus and in the morning children wake to find gifts. 

In countries such as Puerto Rico, Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay, the celebration starts on January 5th with Víspera de Reyes, or Three Kings Eve, where children collect grass or hay in a box, as a gift for the camels. Instead of leaving out milk and cookies for Santa and carrots for reindeer, Hispanic and Latino children leave out their old shoes along with their gift to the camels. 

In the morning, children wake to find their shoes filled with candies and other small gifts along with bigger gifts as well. Family members then gather to exchange gifts with each other and celebrate. Countries like Colombia use this family gathering to take down their Christmas tree and other decorations, as the holiday signals the end of the Christmas season. 

For countries such as Peru and Brazil, the day is celebrated with parades honoring the holiday in a mix of cultural traditions and religious ceremonies. 

And Mexico, a big part of Dia de los Reyes is the Rosca de Reyes. This round sweet-bread is decorated to resemble a king’s crown with the candied dried fruit. Part of the tradition includes a small baby Jesus figurine baked into the bread. Whoever finds the toy must then host a party for everyone on Día de la Candelaria or the Day of the Candles on February 2. 

Interested in making a rosca yourself? Check out this recipe by Latina chef, Yvette Marquez, where she adds her own twist on the traditional dish. 

You might be interested: Try these healthy holiday food recipes by Latina chefs 

We want to know: how do you and your family celebrate Dia de los Reyes? Share your story with us in the comments below or on social media!

Try these healthy holiday food recipes by Latina chefs 

Happy holidays! This time of year is all about family, celebrations, and food. Food is central to our Latina celebrations and it’s easy to get carried away with the oh-so-delicious holiday dishes. If you’re looking to have a bit of a healthier holiday, check out these healthy holiday food recipes below from Latina chefs. 

Ensalada de Noche Buena

Ericka Sanchez of @nibblesnfeasts on Instagram shares her Ensalada de Noche Buena or Christmas Eve Salad recipe on her site. This salad is a traditional staple for Mexican families during the holidays. 

In her post, Ericka describes the origins of the salad, which is named after the Poinsettia (Noche Buena), and also means Christmas Eve in Spanish. “It resembles the beauty and colorful plant that we are so fond of every holiday season. Arranged in a circle, similar to a flower and accented by bright crimson pomegranate arils, like jewels on a wreath, this delicious salad is sweet, savory and crunchy for all to enjoy,” says Ericka. 

 

 

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Mexican Shrimp Cocktail 

Yvette from @muybuenocooking on Instagram is a proud Latina who is developing and sharing traditional Mexican, Latin-Inspired healthy recipes. Her Mexican style shrimp cocktail is a personal holiday favorite and will be sure to shake up your own holiday meal. See the full recipe here.

 

Vegan Sweet Potato Pie 

Who said being healthy means skipping dessert? With this Vegan Sweet Potato Pie by @dorastable, you won’t have to say no to the sweet treats. Rich and creamy and full of seasonal spices, this pie is the perfect addition to any holiday meal. The full recipe for this delicious healthy holiday food recipe can be found on Dora’s site here

 

 

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You might be interested: 5 Latina inspired Thanksgiving recipes to try this year

Buñuelos de Viento

Another healthy holiday sweet treat recipe from @dorastable are these crispy snowflake-shaped fritters covered in cinnamon sugar. Buñuelos de Viento are a traditional Mexican holiday treat with Spanish and Arab origins. Dora writes in her blog post about the recipe, “In Mexico, buñuelos were adapted to the flat tortilla shape (buñuelos de rodilla) or the snowflake shape (buñuelos de viento) made with a rosette mold.” 

These treats are easy to make and great for large holiday gatherings. See the full recipe here

 

 

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latina inspired thanksgiving recipes

5 Latina inspired Thanksgiving recipes to try this year

Thanksgiving is right around the corner and here at Latinas in Business we can’t help but think of our favorite holiday dishes. While the holiday is not traditionally celebrated in most Latin American countries, many U.S.based Latinos have adopted the holiday, blending cultures and traditions to make it their own. 

And if there’s anything Latinos know well, it’s how to celebrate with good food and family. At its heart, Thanksgiving is a time to gather with loved ones, give thanks for our blessings, and share delicious food with one another. 

Below are a few exciting recipes from Latina chefs who have added their own Latina inspired twists to traditional Thanksgiving dishes. 

Chipotle Citrus Thanksgiving Turkey

Starting off the main course is this flavorful chipotle citrus turkey recipe by Isabel Eats on Instagram. It brings together chipotles, orange and lime zest, fresh rosemary, garlic, oregano, salt, black pepper and lots of butter to create a tender and juicy dish that is sure to leave guests speechless.

 

You can find the full recipe over at Isabel’s blog! 

Chorizo Stuffing 

This chorizo stuffing by chef Ericka Sanchez will leave you stuffed and still wanting more! Blending traditional Hispanic flavors with a Thanksgiving staple, Erika’s recipe takes this dish to a whole new level. 

 

Rich and Creamy Pumpkin Soup 

Another stunning recipe shared by Ericka on her food-Instagram, Nibbles N Feasts, is this rich and creamy pumpkin soup. Add this to your Thanksgiving menu for a warm and filling side dish. 

 

 

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Find the full recipe over on Ericka’s blog! 

Jalapeno Cranberry Sauce 

Mix up your Thanksgiving by adding a little spice to the traditional cranberry sauce. Described as “sweet and tart and spicy and zingy,” this recipe by Growing Up Sarita on Instagram will make the perfect addition to your holiday meal. 

 

 

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Pumpkin Flan 

Finally, for dessert, this pumpkin flan recipe by Nicole Presely is sure to leave an impression on your guests. Combining the popular Hispanic dessert of flan with the traditional holiday flavors of pumpkin spice, this desert is the perfect sweet treat to conclude a Latina inspired Thanksgiving! 

 

Get the full recipe over at Nicole’s blog!

5 hearty autumnal vegan meals to try this month

November is World Vegan Month, a time when plant-based eaters from across the globe come together to celebrate their lifestyle, educate, and share recipes. 

A vegan, or plant-based lifestyle, has many health benefits, especially for Latinos who are prone to suffer from health issues such as high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure. Statistically, Latinos are also more likely to suffer from heart disease. On average,  Hispanic women are likely to develop heart disease 10 years earlier than non-Hispanics, according to data from Go Red for Women.

Incorporating more plant-based dishes into one’s diet can help reduce these risks over time by reducing the consumption of meat and dairy, often found in many traditional Hispanic recipes. 

As the colder months approach here in the Northern hemisphere, we’re all looking for some warm, hearty comfort foods to get us through the autumn and winter. Below are a few autumnal vegan meals to try out this month from The Vegans Club on Instagram. 

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Leek, Chestnut and Apple Stuffing

With Thanksgiving right around the corner, this vegan stuffing recipe will make a great addition to the traditional holiday meal. 

 

Carrot Soup 

Stay warm throughout the winter with this delicious carrot soup. It’s perfect for a quiet evening meal or prepare ahead for a quick lunch on the go. 

 

“Ricotta” Stuffed Delicata Squash

This colorful dish will brighten up your day! Stuffed with flavor, this vegan dish promises to leave you full and satisfied. 

 

Creamy Curry Pasta

In the mood for a creamy, pasta sauce? This curry pasta dish will do just the trick, and without any dairy! 

 

Tuscan Kale and White Bean Soup

Finally, this flavorful Tuscan kale and white bean soup is exactly what you’ll need once the snow starts coming down. Prepare this for the whole family and bask in the tasty warmth of this vegan dish. 

 

Tania Molina, the architect who left her career for her chocolate dream

 Tania Molina is the founder and CEO of Villakuyaya Organic Dark Chocolate. Originally an architect by profession, Tania shifted her career in 2014 with the entrepreneurial dream to create her own chocolate brand. Drawing on her Ecuadorian roots, Tania created Villakuyaya with quality ingredients and sustainable practices as her guiding goals. 

Family and culture are at the heart of Villakuyaya chocolate 

Known for having some of the best quality cacao in the world, Ecuador is at the heart of Tania’s business. Her family and heritage play a huge role in Villakuyaya

“My home and  heart is always Ecuador, and Quito where I was born and resided. Now, I have found my family and my  new home is Rockland County, New York, where I manage my business in-between changing diapers and  teaching my son potty-training. In every chocolate bar and story I get to tell to my customers though, the chocolate and the heart of the business is and always will be Ecuadorian,” says Tania. 

Tania’s passion for chocolate-making and experimenting with flavors came from her grandmother, Juana, who had a natural gift with seeds, plants, and herbs. Tania remembers fond memories and experiences with her grandmother and cacao: memories of eating the cacao seed pulp, toasting in the crock, and the cacao powder with the hot milk. These memories remind Tania of her grandmother’s kindness, her love for her grandchildren, and her respect for nature–virtues that Tania has embedded into her business. 

“The heart of the business is and always will be Ecuadorian.” (Photo courtesy Tania Molina)

And Villakuyaya is very much a family business at heart. 

“My ‘employees’  are my husband, mother and father. We’ve traveled to do chocolate shows in Washington D.C., Seattle, London,  Amsterdam, Paris and other places. It’s not money or profit that’s the success, but it’s more about longevity, expanding the brand further, and sharing my chocolate with more people who will love it,” says Tania. “And  now, with my son, I would love to maintain the business and be able to tell him many years from now that mommy was able to survive and succeed in the business, and would love for him to be a part of it with us.”

You might be interested: Maya Jacquez shares Mexican food culture and heritage through The Pinole Project 

Defining success and offering a helping hand 

For Tania, success is about far more than just profit. Every sale makes a difference, and every repeat customer is a blessing and a joy. 

Villakuyaya

Success is about far more than just profit. Every sale makes a difference, and every repeat customer is a blessing and a joy. (Photo courtesy Tania Molina)

When she first began her journey into the chocolate industry, everything was new and Tania had to learn the ins and outs of the industry “on the fly.” There were many bumps along the way as she learned all about chocolate from cacao farmers in Ecuador, managing sustainability and quality, as well as the manufacturing aspects such as packaging, order requirements, importation and exportation taxes, and  USDA requirements on packaging. Deciding to focus on the US marketplace also posed a challenge at the time for Tania, who had only visited the country a handful of times. 

“Over time, after I reevaluated all my real goals for the  company, I was able to visualize everything in a way where I could raise my company into the black, all  the while learning about the industry, market and trends in the chocolate business. Of course, and then  Covid-19 happened, which gave the entire industry a massive challenge just to stay afloat.” 

However, despite the struggles early on, Tania continued with her dream. Now, after many years in the industry, Tania has learned many valuable lessons and knows what to expect. Her greatest strength is her vibrant personality and the quality and variety of her chocolate, she says. 

“I love to meet people at chocolate shows or events and talk about chocolate making, the business or what made me make a chocolate bar flavor the way that  I did. It’s a tough business, very competitive and also filled with nice people with big dreams.”  

Tania remembers her first chocolate show in the United States and how the kindness of a stranger saved her that day. 

“My mother, father, and I spent the whole week preparing everything for that day. We made a checklist of everything we would need, and when the day arrived we forgot the tablecloths! I didn’t know whether to cry or laugh, but I always seemed  to have an angel next to me, and this time a very kind Latin lady helped me with tablecloths and other things that I forgot. Amazing kindness from a stranger, but as you learn everyone is in the same boat at these shows and understands each other.” 

Villakuyaya

Chocolate shows with the whole family. (Photo courtesy Tania Molina)

Offering a helping hand to others is sometimes the best thing you can do for someone else. Each entrepreneur knows how challenging and lonely the journey can be at times. For those starting out, seeking others and gathering the necessary tools and knowledge is the first step toward success. 

“Over the last 5 years or so, I think women have  come together to help support and protect each other more than ever before, and to help give each of us  an opportunity to succeed,” says Tania. “I would advise new entrepreneurs to make a business plan, take their time, do research and learn all the angles and  then jump in over prepared for a slow start. It’s not just the company or the career itself, but  also the tools around the company that make it successful.” 

In 2021, there are many ways to gain information and resources for new business owners and entrepreneurs, from YouTube videos, conferences and workshops, mentorship, and guidance from other businesses.

“Take that advice and help, and good luck to all of us wonderful women and  to our dreams.”

Maya Jacquez shares Mexican food culture and heritage through The Pinole Project 

The Pinole Project is a Mexican-American Food Company, founded by Maya Jacquez and her family as an homage to their abuela, Adela Jacquez, and her recipes. Growing up, Maya would visit her grandparents’ humble ranch in Mexico where her grandmother made the family her Pinole Chia Oatmeal. This recipe inspired the company’s first product, inviting the world to their family table to share their heritage, culture, and history with others. 

The Pinole Project, Pinole Project, PinoleProject

The Most Satisfying Vegan Weight Loss Breakfast!

Sharing Mexican culture and family heritage through food 

Founded in January 2020, The Pinole Project took just over 1 year to go from product idea to being available online and nationwide. The project grew from the family’s overwhelming passion to share their abuela’s recipe with the world. Homemade versions of Adela’s Pinole Chia Oatmeal were a regular morning staple in the Jacquez family to fuel their days. 

“Our family has been eating Pinole for centuries, and our abuela Adela would add Pinole into many dishes for more protein and fiber,” said Maya. 

A strong and mighty woman herself, Adela would always say, “Pinole will make you strong.”

The Pinole Project

The Pinole Project pays homage to the family’s abuela, Adela Jacquez and her recipe. (Photo courtesy Maya Jacquez)

The Aztec Superfood is enjoyed all across Latin America and has a rich history in the region. Pinole is a grain made from dried heirloom corn that is then ground and mixed with spices, such as cinnamon. Sometimes chia seeds or sweeteners, such as piloncillo (unrefined whole cane sugar) are also added. 

Once used to fuel Aztec warriors, Pinole is still a source of strength for locals. Today Pinole is eaten by the Tarahumara, an indigenous community living in Northern Mexico. Tarahumara runners are known for their long-distance running abilities. Maya’s grandfather, Arsenio Jacquez, developed a close relationship with the Tarahumara people and served as an interpreter for them for many decades. 

The Pinole Project

Their abuela’s Pinole Chia Oatmeal recipe inspired the company’s first product, inviting the world to their family table. (Photo courtesy Maya Jacquez)

“Our family finds so much strength in being able to share our heritage and culture with the world. The Pinole Project’s mission is to build bridges by sharing Mexican food, history, and culture. We grow when we invite new friends to our table. We believe when we educate the world about Mexico, that we are creating meaningful bonds.”

Overcoming challenges as new entrepreneurs 

With their ‘aha’ moment and the desire to share their grandmother’s recipe with the world, Maya and her family began their journey into entrepreneurship. 

One of their biggest obstacles starting out was finding the right partners to help with manufacturing, ingredient sourcing, and fulfillment. It took many months of conversations and due diligence to make sure they had the right team to succeed.

“It’s very important to have reliable, trustworthy partners because there are so many steps to getting a product in someone’s hands!” said Maya. 

As new entrepreneurs, seeking out entrepreneurial friends and mentors was another strength in overcoming obstacles. Having people who have already been down this road is an invaluable asset to anyone starting out. 

“Entrepreneurship is extremely challenging, especially in the early days (we’re still in this phase). Not only does it help to have peers and mentors to whom you can ask questions and seek guidance, but also there’s comfort in knowing you’re not alone in your journey.”

Despite the early challenges, the rewards have been worth it. Being able to share her family’s culture and heritage through their products has fostered a community that feels a lot like family. 

The High Protein/Fiber Aztec Superfood You’ve Been Missing in Your Life

“We always love seeing our fans and customers send us photos of their oatmeal. We have one supporter in particular whose love and passion for our product makes us feel so happy and eager to achieve success!” Maya shared. “She makes 3-5 Baked Oats recipes per week (consistently for many months now) with our Pinole Chia Oatmeal! Baked Oats is oatmeal made in the oven. It tastes like a delicious, healthy cake (we are obsessed!).”

The Pinole Project, Mexican Food, chocolate pancake recipe

Feeling groggy in the morning? Unfocused? Try this Aztec superfood breakfast recipe and get more!

From a small ranch in Mexico, one family’s recipe has built bridges, creating a community of people who love and celebrate an ancient grain and continue to pass on it’s history to new generations and cultures across the country. 

You might be interested: Mexican roots-inspired Adriana Pavon, fashion designer, and indigenous rights advocate

Pinole Project, PinoleProject, The Pinole Project

“My grandparents showed me what it means to live a meaningful life. They worked so hard on their small ranch in Chihuahua, Mexico to make ends meet. Preserving my family’s legacy and perpetuating Mexican-American food, history, and culture are incredibly important to me.”  

Stay Full & Focused all Morning with this Vegan, Gluten-Free Breakfast!

meatless meals

5 Fresh and sizzling meatless summer meals to try 

Be adventurous this summer by incorporating more plant-based dishes onto your personal menu. Check out some of these fresh and sizzling meatless summer meals to get started! 

The summer months are often associated with BBQ-ing and outdoor fiestas or family picnics in the park. In fact, July is also recognized as National Grilling Month and National Picnic Month. It’s hard for some to think of summer without grilling and meat-filled dishes, especially for Latinos who pride themselves on their asados. However, incorporating more plant-based dishes into our diets has many health benefits. 

Statistically, Latinos are more likely to suffer from heart disease. On average,  Hispanic women are likely to develop heart disease 10 years earlier than non-Hispanics, according to data from Go Red for Women. While there are many factors that contribute to developing these issues, such as genetics, diet also plays a big part. Hispanic diets are often rich in fat from dairy and meats. By reducing one’s consumption of meat and dairy, it can help lower the risk of developing heart disease and other health issues. 

Summer is also the perfect time to be adventurous! Embrace your inner adventurer and experiment with food this season. You don’t have to commit to an all plant-based lifestyle, simply introducing a meatless day of the week can make a difference. One of my personal favorite food-stagram accounts is “Meatless Mondays.” The account offers a variety of fun and fresh meatless meals to try and encourages people to swap out meat at least one day a week. 

If you’re ready for the adventure, then check out some of our favorite fresh and sizzling meatless summer meals below! 

Try these meatless summer meals on your next picnic or party

These meals will make the perfect addition to your next family picnic or outdoor gathering, especially this week during Latino Conservation Week. What better way to celebrate nature conservation than by getting outdoors with friends and family and enjoying some delicious food together!

Sweet Potato Black Bean Enchiladas

 

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Fiery and Fresh Plant-based Tacos

 

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Grilled Stuffed Peppers 

 

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Pasta Primavera 

 

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Chipotle Cauliflower Tacos with Garlic Aioli

 

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Celebrating 4th of July Latina Style! 

The Fourth of July holiday weekend is here! The U.S. national holiday is known for its fantastic firework shows, barbecues, picnics, and outdoor parties. If there’s anything we Latinas love is a good celebration. Today we’re sharing some fun ideas to give your 4th of July a Latina twist! 

Celebrate 4th of July Latina Style! (Design photo created by freepik)

Get the music pumping 

It’s not a Latina party if there isn’t music! Kick off your 4th of July Latina style celebration with some Latin favorites. Curate your own fabulous playlist or invite music-playing friends to bring their instruments and share some live tunes. With the right music, your celebration is off to a great start. 

Make it an asado 

Next– the food. Food is everything at a Latina party. It’s the center focus, the thing that brings everyone together. It is the foundation of the party, especially for a 4th of July celebration where the air is always smokey and sweet from the holiday’s signature BBQs. Here is the perfect place to give the holiday a little Latina flavor! Instead of just the usual hamburgers and hot dogs, make it a truly Latino asado. Incorporate other meats and foods traditional to your country. You can make carne asada marinated with chimichurri, elote, chorizo, and more!  

Fun flavors for all 

While the barbecue is a staple of the holiday, there are other tasty ways to add a Latin touch to your celebration. While you’re outside enjoying the warm weather, cool down with some traditional Latino cocktails and frozen drinks like mojitos, margaritas, and sangria. Then, break out the snacks and appetizers with chips and salsa, guacamole, or your favorite traditional dip, tapas, tortillas, empanadas, and traditional meats, cheeses, and ensaladas. And of course, no Latina meal is complete without the desserts! Prepare some of your favorite sweet treats to share with friends and family. 

Dance the night away

Get ready for a long night! No Latino party is a short event. And what better way to pass the time than to dance to those fun Latino tunes? You can even combine traditional Latin dances and songs with patriotic classics to create fun remixes in a fusion of cultures and heritages. Did you know there’s even a salsa version of The Star Spangled Banner? Check it out on YouTube and let it inspire you to create your own remix as a representation of the melting pot of cultures that makes the U.S. the diverse and multicultural nation it is.

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