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corporate responsibility latina entrepreneur

First impressions count and how hiring companies can help

“Substantial research has affirmed the importance of first impressions while exploring a variety of factors that contribute to their formation,” an article by Mark Rowh of the American Psychological Association affirms.  “For example,” it continues, “a 2009 study in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin found that factors ranging from clothing style to posture play a role in how impressions are formed.”

corporate responsibility latina entrepreneur first impressions

While significant money and energy has been invested in job training, resume preparation, and job creation, little has been done to address the most nuanced yet important aspect of job hunting – the interview suit. Despite the fact that prospects bring enhanced resumes and skills, they remain ill-prepared if they lack the proper attire.

The nonprofit Dress for Success describes the dilemma of Emerging Employees as a catch-22. Emerging Employees are preparing themselves to enter the workforce but without a job they cannot afford a suit. And without a suit they struggle to obtain a new job. In an effort to assist, Dress for Success has activated chapters throughout the U.S. to assist women with training and interview attire.

But nonprofits are not the only organizations lending a hand to Emerging Employees. For seven years Men’s Wearhouse, a national men’s apparel retailer, has coordinated a July clothing drive at over 1,100 Men’s Wearhouse locations. Men’s Wearhouse calls its annual clothing drive the National Suit Drive.

In an effort to encourage donations the retailer exchanges 50% discount certificates for donated suits, ties, jackets, shirts, pants, belts, and shoes. This smart incentive not only encourages donations, but also promotes new sales. Donated apparel is distributed to nonprofits throughout the country that provide job ready skills and training to unemployed and underemployed men.

LATINAS IN THE WORKFORCE first impressionsIn the post-Great Recession period Men’s Wearhouse has done a good job of listening to the masses. Today’s consumer expects more than just a product or service. In the post-recession era the business community is expected to reinvest into the communities from which it is earning its profits.

While many may dismiss the National Suit Drive campaign as merely a public relations tactic, the reality is that social responsibility is no longer an option – it is a requirement. In our social media-enabled society where every consumer is a potential influencer, corporations have learned that maintaining and maximizing profits requires a social responsibility strategy.

You might be interested: 5 Steps to a successful interview

In the case of Dress for Success and Men’s Wearhouse, these acts of charity can be the difference between getting the job and spending another week on unemployment. And of course, there should never be anything wrong with doing good business by doing good.

 

 

race gender discrimination

Makeup in the workplace, can your boss tell you what to wear?

Makeup in the workplace, can your boss tell you what to wear? Or how you should dress or groom yourself while in the office or your job? Yes, they can!

race gender discrimination, makeup in the workplace

Emily Jane Perkins , a third-year law student at Northern Illinois University College of Law in Dekalb, Illinois, and a contributor to The National Law Review, relates the case of a casino employee who filed a sexual discrimination lawsuit against her employer, Harrah’s Casino, and lost.

“Harrah’s adopted an appearance policy entitled the “Personal Best” program, where bartenders were required to be ‘well groomed, appealing to the eye, firm and body-toned, and be comfortable with maintaining this look while wearing the specified uniform,’” she explains.

Different makeup in the workplace policies by gender

In this case, only females, but not male employees were required to have their hair “teased, curled or styled,” and to wear stockings, nail polish, and makeup that included lip color.

But one of their female employees, Darlene Jespersen, never wore makeup and she did not comply with this appearance policy. She complained that the policy stated a different requirement for men and women, and was an unequal burden for female employees.

The court did not agree with her assessment and determined that “women as a group did not suffer from the policy and was therefore permissible.”

Did not suffer? There were probably no men in that court! Long hours of manicure, curling and coloring your hair, and taking care of your skin and makeup, dieting and hitting the gym are not only time and money burdens on women but also an unnecessary requirement that –in my view–, “sexualizes” the image of women at work.

The Jespersen v. Harrah’s Operation Co., where the Ninth Circuit upheld a Title VII challenge to an employer’s “grooming and appearance” code continues to receive attention in the legal and non-legal press and generated renewed interest among practitioners on the issue of gender and appearance in the workplace.

Does your employer have an appearance policy? Tell us about it and let us know how this policy affects you and your co-workers, or what your co-workers really feel about it!

We are also looking for contributors to talk about appearance in the workplace. Please contact Susana@latinasinbusiness.us/ if you have a blog related to this topic and would like to share your content with us.

corporate responsibility latina entrepreneur

Successful corporations choose social responsibility

corporate responsibilityBy Jesse Torres

While significant money and energy has been invested in job training, resume preparation, and job creation, little has been done to address the most nuanced yet important aspect of job hunting – the interview suit. Despite the fact that prospects bring enhanced resumes and skills, they remain ill-prepared if they lack the proper attire.

The nonprofit Dress for Success describes the dilemma of Emerging Employees as a catch-22. Emerging Employees are preparing themselves to enter the workforce but without a job they cannot afford a suit. And without a suit they struggle to obtain a new job. In an effort to assist, Dress for Success has activated chapters throughout the U.S. to assist women with training and interview attire.

But nonprofits are not the only organizations lending a hand to Emerging Employees. For seven years Men’s Wearhouse, a national men’s apparel retailer, has coordinated a July clothing drive at over 1,100 Men’s Wearhouse locations. Men’s Wearhouse calls its annual clothing drive the National Suit Drive.

In an effort to encourage donations the retailer exchanges 50% discount certificates for donated suits, ties, jackets, shirts, pants, belts, and shoes. This smart incentive not only encourages donations, but also promotes new sales. Donated apparel is distributed to nonprofits throughout the country that provide job ready skills and training to unemployed and underemployed men.

In the post-Great Recession period Men’s Wearhouse has done a good job of listening to the masses. Today’s consumer expects more than just a product or service. In the post-recession era the business community is expected to reinvest into the communities from which it is earning its profits.

While many may dismiss the National Suit Drive campaign as merely a public relations tactic, the reality is that social responsibility is no longer an option – it is a requirement. In our social media-enabled society where every consumer is a potential influencer, corporations have learned that maintaining and maximizing profits requires a social responsibility strategy.

In the case of Dress for Success and Men’s Wearhouse, these acts of charity can be the difference between getting the job and spending another week on unemployment. And of course, there should never be anything wrong with doing good business by doing good.

 

 About Jesse TorresJesse_Torres

Jesse Torres has spent nearly 20 years in leadership and executive management posts, including executive management roles at financial institutions. In 2013 the Independent Community Bankers of America named him a top community banker influencer on social media. He is a frequent speaker at financial services and leadership conferences and has written several books. He hosts an NBC News Radio show called Money Talk with Jesse Torres.
Follow @jstorres or contact  Jesse@JesseTorres.com

 

LATINAS IN THE WORKFORCE

Dress for Success helps women achieve their goals

The mission of Dress for Success© is to promote the economic independence of disadvantaged women by providing professional attire, a network of support and the career development tools to help women thrive in work and in life.

dress for success dress for interview

Founded in New York City in 1997, Dress for Success is an international not-for-profit organization offering services designed to help our clients find jobs and remain employed. Each Dress for Success client receives one suit when she has a job interview and can return for a second suit or separates when she finds work.

Since 1997, the organization has served more than 700,000 women around the world. Each year we reach nearly 70,000 women in the United States, Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Mexico, Poland, Portugal, Ireland, France, Luxembourg and the West Indies. All Dress for Success organizations are not-for-profit entities, with Dress for Success Worldwide and its U.S. affiliates having 501(c)(3) charitable status and those outside the U.S. operating as registered charities. Clothing donations and financial contributions made to its affiliates within the U.S. are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.

Find out more how to apply visit their website: Dress for Success