Alizanette Rodriguez is a Senior Analyst and an ERG (employee resource group) leader at Verizon. In her position as a SOMOS Global Lead, she is using her voice to support Verizon’s Hispanic/LatinX ERG of 5000+ members. 

As a Latina professional, she has journeyed up the ranks to get to where she is today. Starting in roles such as operator, directory assistance, repair service clerk, to Supervisor and Manager, before rising to Senior Analyst. 

Like many minority women, she struggled with obstacles and limiting beliefs that kept her from getting ahead at times. 

“I struggled with self doubt, and lack of emotional intelligence for managing disappointment,” she shared. 

She also struggled to have her voice heard by leaders. This was frustrating and has pushed her to advocate and amplify minority voices in the areas where she now leads. 

“As a minority, I have more to bring to the table because I think differently. I share from my value system. I advocate for our peoples voices to be heard. I have a keen awareness of the needs of those around me,” said Alizanette. 

Today, she uses her position to foster diversity and inclusion within organizations, promote innovative forward-thinking, and support other Latina and minority women in the workplace.

She was able to overcome her own struggles of not being heard by her own leaders by taking some free leadership courses. These courses offered resources that helped Alizanette become more confident in her own voice and stand up for herself when she was not being heard. 

“The course is supporting me by providing tools that I have been implementing. Soon, I was being recognized by my business for my role as an ERG leader and awarded by my organization for my contribution to the company. I have also been asked to be a guest speaker in the area of Global Diversity Equity and Inclusion space,” she said. 

 Alizanette Rodriguez, Verizon SOMOS leader. (Photo source: Verizon)

What we’re reading: Healing Leadership: How to Lead, Love, and Thrive in Business and Life

A major lesson learned is that surrounding yourself with like-minded people helps one become more creative and push the limits in one’s own spaces. Mentors and peers help one grow and that support is so valuable especially for minority women in their careers and professions. 

Another lesson learned is to always take a moment to celebrate your successes. “I learned from a fantastic role model, to create a treasurer chest and add accomplishments along the way and pull them out to celebrate those moments. Not only to do that for the moments that matter to me but to also utilize it to create a fantastic end of year review. It has helped me progress well the past two years.” 

Being a minority woman in any career can be challenging and frustrating but success is possible and there are people who will help you get there, but it starts with you. To other minority women looking to advance in their careers, Alizanette said, “Envision your success and examine the what-if opportunities without fear but with courage.” 

Alizanette’s persistence, determination, and commitment drive who she is and have helped her find success in her own career. 

“Constantly having a growth mindset,” she added.

Finally, leaning in on one’s culture and heritage gives you an edge and unique perspective which you bring to your position. 

 “My culture, my heritage, my boldness all come from being Latina,” said Alizanette. “My language is a gift for communicating and providing a space for my community.” 

Find your people, speak up, and celebrate what makes you different and you will find success is not far away. 

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Author

  • Victoria Arena

    Victoria Arena is a writer and student, passionate about writing, literature, and women's studies. She is bilingual, fluent in both English and Spanish. She holds an Associates in Fine Arts for Creative Writing, and a Bachelor's in English Literature from Montclair State University.

By Victoria Arena

Victoria Arena is a writer and student, passionate about writing, literature, and women's studies. She is bilingual, fluent in both English and Spanish. She holds an Associates in Fine Arts for Creative Writing, and a Bachelor's in English Literature from Montclair State University.

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